Raising onto the platform & removing trailer

O.K here is the concrete block and railway sleeper platform, this worked really well.

It helps to have someone else with you,

1. for safety should it go pear shaped

2. to keep an extra eye whilst going through the Jacking process.

Here is the jacking taking place, slowly bit by bit no rush and avoid point loading, use flat bits of plywood.

Here is the jacking taking place, slowly bit by bit no rush and avoid point loading, use flat bits of plywood. Jacking UNDER the railway sleeper left side then right 100mm (4″) at a time, simple.

As the boat was on the trailer I only had to jack it up around 200mm, just enough to add concrete blocks to the piles left and right and position the railway sleepers as needed.

Make sure your block piers are staggered, as you can see here dry stacked (i.e no mortar) but level, the sleeper will rest nicely and spread load.

Make sure your blocks on the piers are staggered, as you can see here, dry stacked (i.e no mortar) but level, the sleeper will rest nicely on a plywood shim/packer across blocks and spread load.

Once level, on all four piers it is just a matter of carefully driving out the trailer, (had just a couple of inches spare either side)

Once level, on all four piers it is just a matter of carefully driving out the trailer, (had just a couple of inches spare either side)

 

And here she is below now suspended so that I can get all underneath and all around the Bilge keels to blast them, epoxy fill, primer and paint them. Once I have finished with the Bilge keels I will put her  sitting on her bilge keels on the two block piles directly under the bilge keels in the photo below. Then it is a matter of reversing this process to get her on the trailer before painting the hull. Meanwhile the trailer will be out of the way giving good access.

 

Suspended nicely with plenty of access underneath

Suspended nicely with plenty of access underneath.

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Restoration of Velella (ex Cornish Lady, sail no:154), a Kingfisher K20 twin bilge keel yacht from Plymouth UK

Here is ‘Velella’, she used to be called ‘Cornish Lady’ and before that in 1990 she was called ‘Puffin’.

You’ll see why we called her Velella later on.

She is sail number 154 on the KYOA website fleet number list.

Velella is a 20ft Kingfisher K20 twin cast iron bilge keel family cruiser, built between 1959 and 1967. I will add a more accurate date when I get more information from the KYOA (Kingfisher Yacht Owners Association). KYOA can be found here:

http://www.kyoa.org.uk/k20technical.htmImage

 

 

 

So why name her Velella?

Well a few years ago after a storm I found a load of these little sea creatures on a place called Newgale beach in Pembrokeshire West Wales UK, I had spent yrs working at Sea, lived by the Sea all my life and never had come across these before, and they were stunning to look at!

This is what they look like, but most importantly they are commonly called ‘By the wind Sailors’!!

velella 1

Well because we are going to paint our Kingfisher K20 blue and because it also is a ‘By The Wind Sailor’,

Velella it is!

Oh and I must add this bit so I don’t take the credit, it was my wife’s idea!

Actually she said call it ‘by the wind sailor’ to which I replied, ‘that’s too long to paint on her’, but the text book name might be o.k?

Velella Velella

The following on posts will be of her restoration and then sailing her!